COVID-19 May Have Just Saved US Healthcare


There’s nothing like a good crisis to cause a re-evaluation of how we do things. While any epidemic is sure to stress the health system of just about any country, in the United States we needed to be jarred out of our comfort zone to re-think how we do things and how we more efficiently deliver healthcare services to the population.

While no one is doubting the dedication of our doctors and nurses or the many others involved in the delivery of health services, we have unfortunately inherited a broken legacy system from the 1940s that has struggled to contain costs, and to provide healthcare services to all who need them.

In fact, COVID-19 may have just saved US Healthcare from its swan dive – and a spiraling decline of rising costs, and diminishing reimbursement rates, while much of the population is denied access. Meanwhile hospitals have frantically engaged in massive cost shifting between federal, state, IHS, and insurance systems to try and stay afloat. Many haven’t, and that has been devastating for the rural communities they once served. Let’s face it, the system has been broken for a quite a while, and we have done very little about fixing it. COVID-19 however, has changed that!

The truly massive growth in telehealth and telemedicine since February has been amazing. Doctors and nurses love it, patients love it, and it keeps the slightly sick away from those who may be highly contagious and in need of radical medical intervention. Both primary care and specialist physicians have commented how many more patients they can see in an hour using video technology, but there are things that we need to fix.

This session looks at what the future of digital healthcare will be, using new tools, new approaches and improved broader access to health services. It will examine necessary changes to regulation, patient identity verification, cybersecurity and the rise of healthcare IoT including wearables.

Hear from two national experts as they share their thoughts for the future of US healthcare.


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